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What's in a Name?

Posted on 06/07/2013 @ 11:04 AM

Many have spoken about the power of a name. Romeo, who is deeply in love with Juliet and who is limited by family names and political realities, is exasperated: “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet” (Romeo and Juliet, Act II, Scene ii). In Harry Potter, “He-Who-Must-Not-Be-Named” (Voldemort) commands such fear (and respect?) that people are afraid even to mention his name. Names such as Madoff, Weiner, Spitzer, Sanford, and others have brought disgrace on themselves and on the communities and families they affiliate with.

In many (usually more traditionally observant) Jewish communities, G-d is referred to as “Hashem” which means “The Name.” To fulfill the commandment not to take G-d’s name in vain, a fence was established to protect from using G-d’s name in vain.

But what about your name?

“There are three names by which a person is called: one name that his/her parents call him/her, one name that people call him/her, and one name that he/she earns for him/herself. The last name is the best of all” (Midrash Tanchuma, Parshat VaYakhel I).

Our identities do not develop in a vacuum. Our parents give us a name and other people call us by a name, and those names impact both who we are and how we relate to and connect with a larger community. Despite the fact that we do not choose the names that we are given, we do have a name that we earn for ourselves. When somebody says your name, they and others impart meanings and associations. This is also true of organizations, products, and brands. When somebody says “BBYO” or “Leviticus AZA,” what does that mean to them? And what can we do to proactively influence what we would like it to mean to others?

What will you do today to you earn a name that you will be proud of? May we, together, help BBYO, our regions/councils, and our chapters earn names that will inspire growth and deep impact.

(My name is Ira J. Dounn, Director of Jewish Enrichment for the Northeast Hub, and I wrote this Shabbat message).

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What Happens Whern We Don't Have Faith

Posted on 05/31/2013 @ 11:02 AM

In this week’s parsha, Shelach Lecha, Moses sends twelve “spies” out on a journey to survey the land of Canaan, which God ultimately wants the Jews to inhabit. All but two come back with news that, as promised, the land is filled with milk and honey, but inhabited by giants. They say “WE cannot overcome them” and in doing so spread fear throughout the rest of the Jews.

When the Jews cry out that they, as a group, cannot overcome the might of Canaan’s inhabitants, what are they saying? They are questioning their abilities to inhabit the land promised to them by God. They do not have faith that God can help lead them through times of challenge, to overcome the giants and take control of the land promised to them. As a result they are punished for their questioning, forbidden to enter the land, doomed to wander the desert for 40 years until everyone who lost faith has died.

How much do we miss out on when we question our own or others’ abilities? Sometimes in life we have to take a leap of faith, or put our trust in others. As BBYO staff we give our teens the tools to plan and implement great programs, but at the end of the day they have to be the ones to make things happen. We work with our advisors to ensure they feel confident leading their chapters to greatness, but we are not always there when chapter programs happen. Having faith and relinquishing control are hard things to do.

Of course, it’s impossible to really know how much I have missed out on, but I’d imagine that if I made a list of all the time I didn’t have faith in myself, or those around me, I’d be faced with a long line of opportunities lost – from first dates to job opportunities to empowering athletic accomplishments. The ancient Israelites missed out on the promised land. While hopefully we haven’t missed anything quite that dramatic, surely our lives have been altered by lost faith. I challenge you to take the next opportunity to have faith in yourself, or in someone else, and see what happens.

This Shabbat Message was faithfully crafted by Aleeza Lubin, Director of Jewish Enrichment, Midwest Hub

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Are There Any Good Answers?

Posted on 05/24/2013 @ 10:55 AM

This past week, the people of Moore, Oklahoma and several nearby smaller communities, had the experience of chaos rip through their lives. After the 50 terrifying minutes in which a category 5 tornado destroyed hospitals, businesses, homes, and schools, leaving 24 dead—10 of them children and one as young as 4 months—and 200 injured, it was hard not to wonder who to blame for leaving hundreds of innocent people homeless, hurt, and terrorized. How do we begin to understand such destruction, such pain, and what happens when we find answers which just don't suffice?

Throughout the history of Jewish thought, the question 'why do bad things happen to good people?' has resurfaced over and over. Some of our Biblical ancestors professed a profound connection between the performance of mitzvot and the blessing, or disfavor, of God. Obedience ensures blessing, and disobedience, destruction. When Job asked God why he was meant to meaninglessly suffer, God replied: Where were you when I laid the earth’s foundation? Tell me, if you understand. Who marked off its dimensions? Surely you know!...Who cuts a channel for the torrents of rain, and a path for the thunderstorm, to water a land where no one lives, an uninhabited desert to satisfy a desolate wasteland and make it sprout with grass? Job's author fights against an earlier idea that human action has any influence on God whatsoever, while demanding that humans be more humble about their understanding of how the world works. This popular answer, while effective, quashes Job's and our freedom to question and grapple with life's ultimate questions.

Our Sages from the Mishna and the Talmud, attempted to make sense of why good and evil befall people:

If a person sees that painful suffering visits them, let them examine their conduct...if they examine and find nothing, let them attribute it to the neglect of the study of Torah...

In a bold move, the Rabbis simultaneously simplify and complicated the issue even further. When chaotic forces rise against order and harmony, the Jewish people should hold on even tighter to their values of ongoing self-assessment (teshuva) and heroic spiritual activism (the study of Torah). Making our lives meaningful while trying to understand a complex and contradictory world does not mean having to figure out our purpose each time tragedy befalls us. Rather, it requires us not lose sight of the world we want to live in, even with the uncertainty of the future and the mystery of needless suffering.

After a tragedy such as this, may God's eyes be our eyes, to see clearly and fully who needs our support. May God's hands be our hands, open wide to those in need of shelter and warmth. And may our words be God's words, to comfort the mourning, to raise up the fallen, and bring blessing to those in need of healing.

This Shabbat message was written by Rabbi Zac Johnson, Director of Jewish Enrichment for the Western Hub

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Shampoo. Rinse. Repeat.

Posted on 05/17/2013 @ 04:59 PM

Wait, what day is it? Is today Monday? Or Friday?

This week has brought back memories of this fall. Day on, day off, day on… and then it’s Friday again and we have a weekend. There was even an early Shabbat Message about it – "If you’re not working, can you take a break?

One of the reasons that weeks like this are so challenging is our incredible reliance, as humans, on routine. Routines are shortcuts for our brains – we don’t have to start from scratch each time we need to make a sandwich, get dressed or drive to work. We know what to do when we first walk into the office each morning – and we probably vary very little from our traditional daily routine.

Except on weeks like this.

Wednesday didn’t find us at the office. Neither did Thursday. And, for many of us, these days were pretty far from our usual structure. We had to start from scratch – what to do with this time? Go to synagogue for learning? For prayer? Not at all? What to wear? What to eat? Who to spend time with?

These open times, and the decisions that we make in them, have the opportunity to tell us a lot about our values. Because there are fewer external constraints (No meetings! No programs to work on!), we can’t hide the fact that we are responsible for the choices we make about our time.

What did you do with your two days? If you really think about the decisions you made – what does that tell you about your life right now? If your answers surprise you, are there ways to bring your time more in line with your values? And worry not, there will be more interrupted schedules ahead for you to try them out!

Taking a break from routine to write this Shabbat Message was Rachel Meytin, Director of Panim and Jewish Enrichment.

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Um… aren’t you forgetting something?

Posted on 05/10/2013 @ 05:08 PM

I recently read an article that compared Shavuot to a “forgotten stepchild.” The author lamented that many Jewish people don’t know Shavuot: don’t know what, how, or why we celebrate Shavuot.

Shavuot (literally ‘weeks’), which occurs seven weeks after Passover, marks the giving of the Torah at Mount Sinai. It is a celebration of Torah and education. Many Jews around the world stay up all night to study the Torah and other topics of interest to honor this special moment in our history. Religiously, it is known as one of the “shalosh regalim” - the three pilgrimage holidays so important that visits to the Holy Temple occurred on these dates.

Knowing its important connection to our history, why do so many Jews forget to celebrate Shavuot??

On Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur synagogues are crowded. On Simchat Torah we sing and dance with the Torah, and celebrate its ending and beginning. Almost every Jewish family I’ve met celebrates Passover in one way or another. Chanukah is religiously minor, but it is celebrated by even the most secular Jews. Purim, a relatively modern addition to the calendar, is widely marked by costumes, groggers and Hamentaschen.

Shavuot should be no less significant in our lives than these other holidays. It marks when the Jewish people received the Torah. In this moment we, the Jewish people, entered into our covenant with God. This relationship is a huge basis for our religious practice. Without Shavuot, when we received the Ten Commandments (and the Torah itself!), we wouldn’t practice the mitzvot which help to push us to dedicate ourselves to our religion.

As Jewish professionals, we should think of the ways we can make this holiday stand out more with our teens and families. Let’s “Ask the Big Question,” How do we give Shavuot the respect it deserves? The MyJewishLearning Shavuot page has a nice variety of ways to observe and basic facts about Shavuot – along with some great cheesecake recipes!

For me, I may not stay up all night to study the Torah, but I may push myself to appreciate that this holiday is a “yontif.” It’s different than the other days of the week. And it will not be the forgotten stepchild this year for me. Next week on Wednesday and Thursday, when you have your days off, remember why we have the time off. Remember that had we not received the Torah on Mount Sinai, we wouldn’t be the Jewish people we are today. What will you do to remember Shavuot?

Remembering to create this Shabbat Message was done by Danielle Hercenberg, Wisconsin Region Program Associate.

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What does the prayer that you're saying mean (to you)?

Posted on 05/03/2013 @ 12:38 PM

As part of my work in BBYO’s PDI program, I have had the opportunity to look at the ways prayer is approached in a variety of pluralistic educational settings. My research indicates that our teens sometimes know the “what” in prayer, but rarely know the “why” in prayer. They might know how to recite a prayer, but rarely do they know what that prayer means. The same may be true for many of our staff, advisors and other adult partners.

So let’s take a look at one of our central prayers – the Ve’Ahavta (Deuteronomy 6:4-9): “You should love Hashem your G-d with all your heart, with all your soul, and with all your might. Set these words which I command you this day upon your heart. Teach them diligently to your children, and speak of them when you sit in your home and when you walk on the way, when you go to sleep and when you wake up. Bind them as a sign upon your hand, and let them serve as a reminder between your eyes. Write them on the doorposts of your houses and gates.”

Have you ever paused to think about this prayer?
• What is love? (And especially, what is love of G-d and how does a person love G-d?)
• Can love be commanded?
• Why is it important for “these words” to be in all of these places and at all of these times?

Next time your teens are preparing to recite the Ve’Ahavta in services, encourage them to deepen the explanation and content around their prayer experience. With a little guidance – and some curiosity – teens can craft content-rich and creative services and programs that align well with the meaning of the prayers.

You might also consider taking this focus on prayer further by turning study into action:
• Some recite the Shema before bedtime with their children – and fulfill “when you go to sleep” and “teach them diligently to your children” simultaneously. Consider inviting teen participants on conventions or summer experiences to create a meaningful practice through reciting the Bedtime Shema in small groups together before lights out.
• Some wrap tefillin in order to fulfill the mitzvah to “bind them as a sign.” Consider offering tefillin wrapping during optional weekday morning minyan on convention and summer experiences. (Tefillin are called “a sign” and Shabbat is referred to as “a sign” [see V’Shamru] – so tefillin are not worn on Shabbat because we only need one “sign.”)
• Ever wonder where the idea of the mezuzah comes from? It comes from right here! Consider decorating mezuzot during services based on the content of this prayer.

On the upcoming holiday of Shavuot, zman matan torateinu (the time of the giving of our Torah), we celebrate the learning that is central to Jewish life. Let’s bring this learning into our programs and conventions throughout the year. Let’s imagine and build a Jewish community where teen leaders and participants are motivated to dive deeper into the meaning of the prayers and rituals. And let’s work together to provide more learning opportunities for our teens, our communities, and ourselves!

(What is the meaning of this Shabbat Message written by Ira J. Dounn, Director of Jewish Enrichment of the Northeast Hub?)

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How Do We Create Sacred Time in Our Everyday Lives?

Posted on 04/26/2013 @ 08:11 PM

This week, we read from the weekly portion, Emor, which discusses the laws and customs of the Biblical festivals, the sacred times in the Jewish calendar. Apart from the holidays, without their majesty and awe-inspiring ceremonies, how do we create sacred time in our everyday lives?

Recently I had the opportunity to see the movie ‘42’ the story of Jackie Robinson, the first Black baseball player to join the Major League. The I time spent watching ‘42’ was undoubtedly sacred, demonstrated by two powerful scenes. First, when Jackie Robinson asks Branch Rickey, the owner of the Brooklyn Dodgers, why he is trying to integrate baseball, Mr. Rickey responds that at one point in his life, he had a chance to help someone who was being oppressed yet he didn't. By helping to integrate baseball, he was making up for a time when he didn't do what he felt he should have done. Second, there is a scene where a player makes a comment to Jackie that perhaps someday everyone will wear number 42 and no one will be able to tell the players apart. What a sacred time it will be when we don't judge someone by their sexuality, gender, color, religion, or creed!

Both of these anecdotes reminded me of what makes my time sacred. When I can reach out and help someone in need, when I can give my time somewhere and really make difference, when I encourage people to get along with each other or simply say a kind word to someone else, I feel that I have both experienced and helped someone else experience a sacred moment. We often wait for these moments to occur, but I believe that this week's Torah portion charges us with the responsibility to make these moments happen for ourselves and for others.

We are taught in Mishnah Sanhedrin, that if we save one life we save an entire world. What an incredible statement about the value of a making a difference in the life of even one person. The entertainers, Seals and Crofts provide us a model when they sing, "we may never pass this way again...." Since we may never pass this way again, let us promise that when we see an opportunity to make a difference, we will seize it!

May your Shabbat this week by a holy and sacred time for you.

This Shabbat message was written by Rabbi Bruce Aft, spiritual leader of Adat Reyim in Springfield, VA, and long-time International Kallah teacher.

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When Is A Prayer Like A Sacrifice

Posted on 04/23/2013 @ 08:11 PM

The Torah portions over the last few weeks have focused on the different sacrifices, “korban or korbanot,” that God described to Moses. These sacrifices included sin offerings, peace offerings, and offerings for various holidays. They were to be performed on the altar in the Tent of Meeting and eventually at The Temple in Jerusalem. But once The Temple was destroyed, sacrifices can no longer be offered. So, how can these laws be relevant to us today?

To answer this question, let’s start with the point of the sacrifices themselves. The meaning of the root of the word Korban actually translates to “closeness.” Korbanot (plural) were given in order for the Jews to bring themselves closer to God. When the Holy Temple was destroyed, the Rabbis developed prayers to replace the act of sacrifice in the temple and bring people closer to God. Prayer services follow the same repetition patterns (three times daily with an extra on Shabbat) and share many of the same focus points as sacrifices did. Prayers - and then communal prayer services - become the way in which Jews could acknowledge a higher power, give thanks, atone for sins, and bring themselves closer to God.

For some, prayer is an effective way to achieve “closeness” to God, to Judaism, and to spirituality. Reciting traditional prayers can bring someone not only closer to the divine, but also to the generations of Jewish people who recited the very same words. Prayer services can help build kehillah (community), console an individual in distress, or help an individual deepen their own Jewish identity.

In January, ONR BBYO was honored to be given our very own Torah by a very dedicated donor. Right before Pesach at our Regional Convention, I had the honor of working with a teen to plan and lead a Shabbat morning service and Torah reading for his very first time. He later expressed that this experience was one he will never forget and helped him feel much closer to his Judaism.

For many of us, however, traditional prayer may not always be a comfortable or familiar route to achieve “closeness.” This Shabbat, I challenge you to pick a circumstance in your life that you are thankful for, wish to atone for, or seek help for, and think about expressing that wish through a prayer. It doesn’t have to be a traditional prayer – you can even write your own. Even though we no longer make sacrifices on the altar in the temple, and even for those of us who don’t regularly attend services at a synagogue, prayer can still be a powerful vehicle to bring us closer to our religion, spiritually, and the sometimes seemingly outdated laws of our Torah.

This Shabbat Message is offered by Leora Hoenig, Program Associate, Ohio Northern Region

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Copy of Make a Copy of This

Posted on 04/23/2013 @ 08:11 PM

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Who's in Your Mirror?

Posted on 04/20/2013 @ 08:11 PM

There’s a new video going around, produced by Dove. The premise is simple: a sketch artist makes two drawings of a woman. The first is based on her own description of herself, the second on a stranger’s description of her. (I know some in the blogoshere are questioning the diversity of the women in the ad, or the points made through the ad, but just stay with me for now!)

Not surprisingly, the two images differ dramatically. In the Dove video, the self-described pictures are harsher, sadder, and more closed-off. The women look tired. The strangers, however, described “happy eyes” and “friendly smiles.”

I wonder – this can’t just be about how we perceive the shape of our nose or the prominence of that scar we’ve always hated. Our self-image goes much deeper: who we are as a Jew, a human, a son or daughter, a parent, a friend, an educator, a mentor… How do we see ourselves? How does that differ from how others see us? If we focus on the negative, it must affect how we see ourselves. Without becoming pompous or self-aggrandizing, how can we learn to integrate the positive that others see so readily?

In one of my favorite Jewish collections of wisdoms, Pirkei Avot, we find this quote: “Ben Zoma said: Who is one that is wise? One who learns from every person. (4:1)”

Every person, Ben Zoma said. You count. And so does the stranger. And your teens. And your teens’ parents. So, to be wise, we must allow those other voices to be integrated into our internal images. Next time you look in the mirror (physically or metaphorically!), remember to give voice to how others see you - - you may just get a little wiser in the process.

When the author looks in the mirror, Rachel Meytin, Director of Panim & Jewish Enrichment always smiles back.

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I Don't Know...

Posted on 04/12/2013 @ 08:11 PM

How comfortable are you saying that you don’t know?

At the very beginning of the Babylonian Talmud, it states: “Teach your tongue to say: ‘I don’t know’” (Berachot 4a). In today’s culture, this doesn’t feel natural. One can imagine several cases, especially at work, when saying “I don’t know” would be problematic. Your supervisors, your peers, or your communities might think you are incompetent or that you haven’t done enough research. To be sure, there are times when saying “I don’t know” is the wrong answer.

But education hinges on the premise that there are things that we do not yet know that we would like to learn. Learning is a lifelong pursuit, and it’s ok not to know the answer! It’s ok to say, “I’m not sure, and I’ll look into it and get back to you.” How can one learn if one already knows?

Rabbi Chaim Brovender, Rosh Yeshiva (head of school) and Torah Scholar, often used to answer questions that we asked him in class as follows: “I have two answers: #1 I don’t know #2” and then he would tell us the answer as he understood it.

A well-respected doctor once told me that after years of practicing medicine, he became a medical expert because he knew what he did not know.

Not knowing can be a strength when it is used correctly and paired with a commitment to learn and to grow.

In the next few weeks we will roll out the Jewish Enrichment Specialist Team (JEST), which will focus on training staff, advisors, and teen leaders on areas in which they would like to grow to improve the content quality and programming excellence in BBYO. There are many things that we are still learning, and this will be an opportunity to learn what we do not know, and to continue to develop our knowledge.

What is it that you do not know that will help you improve BBYO program content and quality? Please let me know what you don’t know at idounn@bbyo.org. And then we can work on some answers together.

(1. I don’t know who wrote this Shabbat Message, 2. Ira J. Dounn, Director of Jewish Enrichment for the Northeast Hub, wrote this Shabbat Message.)

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When is a prayer like a sacrifice?

Posted on 04/05/2013 @ 08:11 PM

Tags: prayer

The Torah portions over the last few weeks have focused on the different sacrifices, “korban or korbanot,” that God described to Moses. These sacrifices included sin offerings, peace offerings, and offerings for various holidays. They were to be performed on the altar in the Tent of Meeting and eventually at The Temple in Jerusalem. But once The Temple was destroyed, sacrifices can no longer be offered. So, how can these laws be relevant to us today?

To answer this question, let’s start with the point of the sacrifices themselves. The meaning of the root of the word Korban actually translates to “closeness.” Korbanot (plural) were given in order for the Jews to bring themselves closer to God. When the Holy Temple was destroyed, the Rabbis developed prayers to replace the act of sacrifice in the temple and bring people closer to God. Prayer services follow the same repetition patterns (three times daily with an extra on Shabbat) and share many of the same focus points as sacrifices did. Prayers - and then communal prayer services - become the way in which Jews could acknowledge a higher power, give thanks, atone for sins, and bring themselves closer to God.

For some, prayer is an effective way to achieve “closeness” to God, to Judaism, and to spirituality.  Reciting traditional prayers can bring someone not only closer to the divine, but also to the generations of Jewish people who recited the very same words.  Prayer services can help build kehillah (community), console an individual in distress, or help an individual deepen their own Jewish identity.

In January, ONR BBYO was honored to be given our very own Torah by a very dedicated donor. Right before Pesach at our Regional Convention, I had the honor of working with a teen to plan and lead a Shabbat morning service and Torah reading for his very first time. He later expressed that this experience was one he will never forget and helped him feel much closer to his Judaism.

For many of us, however, traditional prayer may not always be a comfortable or familiar route to achieve “closeness.”  This Shabbat, I challenge you to pick a circumstance in your life that you are thankful for, wish to atone for, or seek help for, and think about expressing that wish through a prayer. It doesn’t have to be a traditional prayer – you can even write your own. Even though we no longer make sacrifices on the altar in the temple, and even for those of us who don’t regularly attend services at a synagogue, prayer can still be a powerful vehicle to bring us closer to our religion, spiritually, and the sometimes seemingly outdated laws of our Torah.

This Shabbat Message is offered by Leora Hoenig, Program Associate, Ohio Northern Region

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How do our mouths celebrate a holiday?

Posted on 03/29/2013 @ 08:09 PM

Tags: seder

Dear Midwesterners,

For the first time in over a decade, my parents and I had seders together this year.  Whether it was because I lived far away, or making plans was too cumbersome, Pesach had never been a family-oriented holiday for me they way it is for so many others.  After we said goodbye to our first night’s hosts around midnight, my mother turned to me, saying “I never knew you were supposed to discuss what is written in the haggadah! That was the best seder I ever had!” With just a little conversation, my mother’s Jewish life had been profoundly renewed. 

There is an ancient mystical teaching about Passover, which says that the Hebrew word for the holiday, Pesach, may be divided into two separate words, rendering it as peh sakh, meaning, ‘the mouth speaks’.  What is the connection between this holiday and speech?

The Torah says: and you shall tell your child on that day 'It is because of this did Adonai take me out of Egypt...'.  The word haggadah itself, means telling.  Children may not be present, no one else may be present, but one is expected to tell the story of Passover, even if just to themselves.  Clearly, the act of speech becomes central to the evening:  questions are asked and answered, songs of Hallel (praise and thanks) are sung--even the haggadah itself claims: whoever elaborates upon the telling of the exodus from Egypt is deemed praiseworthy.  Speaking to each other at our seders and hearing the voices collected in the haggadah are acts of the freedom we have achieved for ourselves and desires for others who are still enslaved. 

Most significant, our seder gives us the opportunity to sing with one another.  We are directed through a very ordered service, but we do not end with more reading or debate. The last two segments of the seder, the words of Hallel and the songs of Nirtzah,indicate that it is songful praise which is the high point of the seder, and perhaps the real reason we came together in the first place.  Singing can achieve what the spoken word may not—pure joy

The haggadah is a tool to help us undertake a powerful practice: our speech—the embodied act which takes up most of our wakeful hours—is transformed.   The seder allows us all to become teachers, storytellers, and singers, the most influential members of Jewish society.  We use these nights to practice that which might be outside of our wheelhouse--that we all might leave, like my mother, emboldened to talk about Jewish texts and customs, as well as our Jewish lives, confidently and authentically.

This Shabbat Hol HaMoed (intermediary days of Passover) message was written by Rabbi Zac Johnson, Director of Jewish Enrichment for the Western Hub.

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We've Sprung Ahead- Now Bring in the New You!

Posted on 03/15/2013 @ 05:54 PM

BBYO Shabbat Message of the Week

When I was a special education teacher in New York, I had a colleague explain to me about the ebbs and flows of a teacher’s motivation. She said it was like a parabola-- we start off really high and full of motivation in September with lots of creative ideas and lesson plans, then in the middle of the year (mostly winter) it hits a low point when we are all lacking innovative ideas and enthusiasm. At the end of the school year is when the motivation goes up again, we get excited for the summer and motivate our students to end the year with a bang.

What if we kept up the motivation and enthusiasm all year? Not just in the beginning and at the end?

Luckily, we are about to hit a time of renewal. Spring is the time of the rebirth of nature, of renewed growth and actualization of latent potential. This is intimated in the very first mitzvah that the Children of Israel were commanded, before leaving Egypt: "This month is for you the head of months; it is for you the first of the months of the year." The root of the word for "month," chodesh, is identical to the root of the word "new," chadash. Thus, "this month," the month of Nissan, is the source of all "renewal" that will appear throughout the year.

Most people who work on a school year calendar don’t consider this time of year to be a first month. We are in a period where the programming year is winding down, summer programs have not yet started, and honestly, some of us may be lacking motivation. And yet - spring is the time to find that latent potential within our teens, and within ourselves! We need to push forward and have that same sense of enthusiasm and dedication we did in the fall.

And so, a challenge for us all: Let us do something NEW and innovative this month. Can you create a new program? Tackle a problem a different way? What will you do to renew yourself to make sure you’re at your best and help create miracles for those around you?

This Shabbat message was renewed by Sheri Rosenberg, Program Associate - Nashville

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What Builds The Relationship Between America and Israel?

Posted on 03/08/2013 @ 07:11 PM

In this week’s Torah portion, Parshat Vayakhel-Pekudei, the Jewish people were tasked with helping to build the Mishkan (the Tabernacle). Not only did they give, they went above and beyond. Moses had to limit the amount that people could give in this important project. The Israelites were committed to ensuring a safe haven for the centrality of their tribe - - just as Jews today are committed to a strong, vibrant, and safe state of Israel. We are fortunate that America and Israel have a strong relationship. America provides Israel with vital military support and $3.1 billion thanks to the Foreign Aid Bill. American and Israel soldiers partner on joint military training, exercises, and development (e.g. Iron Dome, Israel’s state-of-the-art missile defense system and the Arrow Missile Defense System). But it’s not just military collaboration! Take, for example, the case of Re-Walk, technology developed in Israel that allows paraplegic individuals to walk again, which is being used heavily in the United States.

This past week, 60 BBYO teens were part of 13,000 pro-Israel advocates convened in Washington DC for three days of engaging discourse and learning about the most important issues facing Israel and the American-Israeli partnership today. As part of the AIPAC (American Israel Public Affairs Committee) Policy Conference our teens learned about new Israel innovations, listened to Vice President Biden proudly proclaim the US’s continuing support as an ally of Israel, heard from the Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Defense Minister Ehud Barak, Congressman Eric Cantor and Senator John McCain, and engaged in a wealth of interactive discussions and learning opportunities.

As our teens learn from experiences such as AIPAC’s Policy Conference, Israel is much more than just war and hummos. I urge you to explore the wealth technologies, arts, culinary treat and secular and religious thought that Israel is adding to this world. Together we can build the America-Israel relationship through our creative and engaging SpeakUP! programs. We can steer our movement to continue to build this relationship, and to see what we are doing as central to the future of Israel and Jewish people around the world.

(Joey Eisman, Associate for Israel and Global Jewish Peoplehood, advocates on behalf of a strong America - Israel relationship and on behalf of this Shabbat message).

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How Can We Ask The "Big" Questions?

Posted on 03/01/2013 @ 07:11 PM

What is the difference between wisdom, understanding, and knowledge? In this week’s parsha, Ki Tissa, Adonai chooses Bezalel to be a central figure in building the Mishkan (tabernacle), as he possesses all three key qualities. Rashi explains that they are distinct, as wisdom is something learned from others, understanding comes from within oneself, and knowledge is presented from G-d.

Wisdom, understanding, and knowledge are qualities to aspire to, but there is an inherent challenge posed if we are to achieve all three; we must be in conversation with others. How can we gain wisdom from others if we do not engage in learning and dialogue? How can we grapple with our own understanding if we do not bounce ideas off our friends? And how can we perceive G-d’s gift of knowledge if we have no one with whom it is shared?

This week I attended a training session for the Ask Big Questions initiative. This campaign, initiated on college campuses, poses questions like “Where do you feel at home?” and “For whom are we responsible?” The Big Questions are framed so that the topics matter to all, are answerable, and allow participants to share their own stories (wisdom) and internalize the issue at hand (understanding). The beauty of our BBYO communities is that we can guide our teens through similar experiences, adding in the third layer, knowledge. How do our stories resonate based on the Jewish values we possess?

Our teens are caring and concerned citizens, who are looking for ways to explore the issues that surround them. Asking the “Big” questions provides a forum for those conversations, where they can push themselves and their peers in the search for understanding of how to make the world a better place.

Adonai chose Bezalel for the immense task of creating the Mishkan because he possesses wisdom, understanding, and knowledge. Imagine what our teens can achieve if we help foster the development of their spirits to the same level? What big questions can you ask today?

Who created this Shabbat Message? Aleeza Lubin, DJE Midwest Hub

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Unleash Your Inner Superhero- Or Fairy Godmother

Posted on 02/22/2013 @ 07:11 PM

This weekend marks the joyous holiday of Purim (February 23rd-25th) aka “Jewish Mardi Gras.” commemorating the victory of the Jewish people over their oppressors. One of the strangest ways Jews commemorate this holiday is by wearing costumes. What is the connection to this bizarre practice and the actual story of Esther? To truly understand this question, we must have a good understanding of the story.

King Ahasuerus loved the young woman Esther more than any of his other women, and he made her his Queen. He was not aware that Esther was a Jew, for Mordecai, her relative and guardian, advised her not to reveal her true identity.

Haman (hissing sounds), the king’s prime minister and villain of the story hated the Jews (especially Mordecai, because he would not bow down before him) and convinced Ahasuerus it would be in the kingdom’s best interest if the Jews were eliminated. The King gave Haman permission to deal with the Jews as he saw fit, and Haman made plans to massacre them.

Mordecai convinced Esther to speak to the King on behalf of her people. When Esther approached him, King Ahasuerus listened to her story and was outraged by what he heard. He had Haman hanged on the gallows that had been intended for Mordecai, and appointed Mordecai as prime minister in Haman’s place.

How is this drama in any way connected to the practice of dressing in costume? Some say we dress up in costume to commemorate Esther, as she “masked” her identity as a Jew to the King. Even more, it was the “unveiling” of Esther’s true Jewish identity that allowed her to successfully save her people.

This Purim challenge yourself to act in the name of Esther, and try to present your “true” self. In choosing your Purim costume, select something that speaks to your “true” nature – whether dressed as a superhero or fairy godmother. Look at the ways you might mask yourself throughout the year – what could you gain by unmasking? What truth could you share? What might change because of that?

Ultimately, Purim allows us to see past all facades. It allows us to look at our true selves and see the power that lies within each of us.

Recipe for easy Hamantaschen 3 eggs 1 cup granulated sugar ¾ cup vegetable oil 2 ½ teaspoons vanilla extract ½ cup orange juice 5 ½ cups all-purpose flour 1 tablespoon baking powder 1 cup fruit preserves, any flavor

Directions Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease cookie sheets. In a large bowl, beat the eggs and sugar until lightly and fluffy. Stir in the oil, vanilla and orange juice. Combine the flour and baking powder; stir into the batter to form a stiff dough. If dough is not stiff enough to roll out, stir in more flour. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough out to 1/4 inch in thickness. Cut into circles using a cookie cutter or the rim or a drinking glass. Place cookies 2 inches apart onto the prepared cookie sheets. Spoon about 2 teaspoons of preserves into the center of each one. Pinch the edges to form three corners. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes in the preheated oven, or until lightly browned. Allow cookies to cool for 1 minute on the cookie sheet before removing to wire racks to cool completely.

This Shabbat-Purim message was discovered by Melissa Hertwig, Program Associate for Pacific Coast Region in Los Angeles, CA.

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A Shabbat Shalom

Posted on 02/15/2013 @ 07:11 PM

Here is how the afternoon is shaping up: 1500 teens, 150 staff, 300 volunteers, another 50 parents, friends and alumni. One Shabbat.

Over two thousand Jews will celebrate Shabbat together tonight – singing songs and eating a delicious meal. We are all eating dinner together, and the crescendo of singing the birchat hamazon, the blessings after the meal , will be amazing to behold. I am anxiously anticipating the shivers I will feel as I hear the in- and out-of tune voices all joining together.

But, to be honest, that’s not what I’m most excited about. Right after services we’ll continue being one community, but the teens have created 24 different and distinct Shabbat services to lead here at BBYO’s International Convention. One of the many awesome things about this – besides the sheer number of services and all the hard work done by our teens – is the show of pluralism and willingness to explore new ways to experience Judaism. Our teens envisioned these services, selected the prayers and wrote the scripts. We have Reform-style and Orthodox-style services taking place next to each other. There are services that focus on modern Israel’s additions to technology and on the unity of all Jews around the globe.

I am always proud of our teens when they work hard and put their minds to creating new innovative ways to stretch their peers. I’m always proud when the teens are willing to try something and push themselves beyond their natural comfort zone. Tonight and tomorrow, I am doubly proud of what these teens have created – and what we will all be experiencing.

Prepared by Rachel Meytin, Director of Panim & Jewish Enrichment

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Find Your Wings: We Are All Guardians...

Posted on 02/08/2013 @ 07:11 PM

What does the image does the word “guardian” conjure for you? A guardian angel? A handsome knight on a white horse who has been sent forth to protect a princess? There’s a midrash that discusses in which ordinary people become guardians in four ways: · The unpaid guardian: The idea that a person assumes responsibility for another's property without having to be asked. They are acting purely based out of duty and loyalty to another. · The paid guardian is reimbursed for his loyalty to the owner and is assumed to provide a higher level of care. This guardian assumes responsibility, even when damages have been caused to the property beyond their control. · The borrower is responsible to return what has been given to him intact, or make good on its value. This guardian has a higher obligation to make the owner whole because they did not pay to use the item. · The renter who pays for the use of the property upfront and assumes responsibility for returning the property intact - even if the damages are out of their control.

The idea that we have different types of guardian roles is something that we can apply in our lives as BBYO professionals. When we think more beyond traditional property and focus on the guardianship that we provide to our community – these levels of responsibility remain just as relevant: · We ask our teens to look out for each other just out of loyalty. · We ask ourselves, and our teens, to reach for a higher level of responsibility and be held accountable. · We often take on new projects. When we do, we have a responsibility to pass our previous projects intact and with integrity. · We strive for new partnerships, “renting” the resources, people, and even good names of others by providing our support to the partnerships in order to enhance the broader Jewish community.

This idea of guardians is essential to how we operate. It’s how we create community – looking out for each other and holding each other accountable to excellence. We must remember that our duty goes beyond each individual and ultimately is our duty and loyalty to the Jewish community that should drive us.

I challenge you to always strive to be the guardian of your BBYO “property” - our reputation, our teens, and, of course, the future of the Jewish people. Fly on!

This Shabbat Message took flight by Chloe-Anne Ramsey, BBYO Associate Director and BBYO Connect Director, Atlanta Council

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You Can't Do It Alone

Posted on 02/01/2013 @ 07:11 PM

Not many Biblical characters get a Torah portion named after them. There is no Parshat Moses, no Parshat Aaron, or Parshat Miriam. However, this week’s parsha –in which the 10 Commandments are read – is called Parshat Yitro after Moses’ non-Jewish father-in-law, Yitro! What did Yitro do to deserve this rare honor?

When the Jews were in the desert and on their way from Egypt to Mt. Sinai, Moses found himself overwhelmed by the amount of disputes that he had to adjudicate. People would wait in line all day to bring their disputes before Moses. And for Moses, because he was hearing cases all day, there was no work-life blend. Yitro noticed this and said: “The thing you are doing is not good. You will become burned out and the people will also get tired of waiting in line. This is too overwhelming a task for you and you can’t do it alone” (Exodus 18:17-18).

So Yitro suggested to Moses to delegate the more minor hearings to capable and committed people and to share the caseload with them. This shortened the day-long courtroom line, and allowed Moses to focus on the most complex cases and to have a more manageable portfolio.

Yitro’s message is as relevant to us today as it was to Moses then: You can’t do it alone. Without our capable and committed volunteer advisors, we would not be able to accomplish what we achieve with them. Without the teamwork and collaboration of BBYO’s dedicated professionals, the momentum and scope of AZA BBG IC 2013 would not be possible. I invite you to express gratitude to those people in our organization and in your lives that make what you have accomplished and what you achieve possible.

Yitro teaches Moses, possibly the greatest Jewish leader in history, an essential lesson on leadership and shared responsibility. And if Moses can’t do it all by himself, who can?

This Shabbat Message is brought to you by Ira J. Dounn, Director of Jewish Enrichment for the Northeast Hub, and is dedicated to his grandmother, Evelyn Dounn of blessed memory, who has made possible so much so much of what he was and is able to accomplish.

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